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Tuesday, 4 August 2015

NEAT RECTANGULAR CLUTCH


NEAT RECTANGULAR CLUTCH

This is such a neat idea – so darn easy, and so cool.. obviously this is another one that you will try .. and one I am sure make again and again.

Materials used : Indian Polyester cone yarn with a 3.5 mm crochet hook ; markers (optional)
This will be superb with our Indian Laura cotton and a 3.5 – 4 mm crochet hook too.

Size made 8.75 " x 6"

Difficulty level : Easy to intermediate skill level

Stitches used :  (Using U.S terminology)

fdc : Foundation Double Crochet : This is a unique way of starting a project directly with a row of double crochet stitches.  This makes your whole project neat and even.. in a way that you need to do once, to agree!  If you are familiar with fsc, you’ll wonder why you never used this start before !

Extended Single Crochet (e-sc) : hk into st, yo (2 lps on hk), pull through one lp, yo (2 lps on hk),pull through both lps.  One e-sc made. (An e-sc is basically an sc on an sc)



The beauty of this pattern is that you could work with either an sc , an e-sc or dc.  So while I’ll write out the pattern as per chart, do substitute whatever stitch suits you.

Start with 32 fdc (or as many as you'd like for the length of your clutch purse).  Turn.

In the following row, we’ll work till the end of the row, then work 4 dc along the horizontal bar of that last fdc to and go to the bottom of the fdc row, work one dc in the bottom of that same fdc.  We will then continue working along the bottom till the start st.  When we reach the end of this (bottom) row, you’re back at that 1st start fdc, so once again in that horizontal bar we will do 4 dcs, and you will join to the 1st fdc.  This way you will have 6 dc’s at each end of this first fdc start row. 

As explanations below in the instruction will be tedious, please follow this method in the to add the 4 extra dcs in Row 1.  

I would also advise that you keep 4 markers ready.  Now at each corner we’re going to be increasing stitches, and it’s going to get increasingly complicated to start counting stitches.  So if you have this convenient marker, you just move it along and then work the increases only in that corner stitch. 

So how do you find the corner?  In Row 1, we’ll increase by 5 sts.  So we work till the last fdc on this row , then the increase 5 sts, and then 1st again in the same fdc from the bottom end.  So the 1st and 5th st of the increase sts will be your two corners for both ends of your purse.  See chart below.

Now I also notice that as per chart, the designer has worked till the corner st, and then made the increases (from Round 2 on) in the space between the corner st and the next st.  Now this usually works well with a lighter yarn, but I’ve always found that with a bulkier yarn, you get a space there (as we’re adding 3-5 sts at that point) – so you could either just make your increases on the marker for the corner st (as I have) or do as the designer has.

Whatever your decision, please note that I will write increase on the marker stitch for convenience.

Row 1 : dc in the 1st fdc and in each fdc till last fdc ; 6 fdc in the same last fdc ; then turning your work 90˚, and working along the bottom of the fdc, dc in each fdc till the 1st fdc ; 5 dc in that 1st (or last for this side) fdc.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st dc.

Identify your four corner stitches, and please set your markers into them.  Remember to move the markers with every row.  In this row, I’ve given you the full stitch count for the corners etc, but from following row, instructions will be ‘to marker’ etc.

From here on, we’ll work in rounds.

Round 2 : 2 dc in the 1st dc ; dc in the next 32 dc ; (3 dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next dc ; 3 dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next dc ; 3 dc in the next dc) ; dc in the next 31 dc ; [3 dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next dc ; 3 dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the last dc].  Join with a sl-st to the 1st dc.

Round 3 : dc in the 1st dc ; dc in the each dc till 1st marker ; 5 dc in the next dc (marker st) ; dc in each dc till 2nd marker ; 5 dc in 2nd marked st ; dc in each dc till 3rd marker ; 5 dc in 3rd marked st ; dc in each dc till 4th marker ; 5 dc in the 4th marked st ; dc in dcs till end.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st dc.

Now move the markers to the centre st of the newly added 5 dcs at each corner. The centre stitch is the 3rd st (i.e centre of this 5 st increase) is our new corner / marked st.


You will also see how our oval start has slowly started taking on proper corners, and a rectangular shape.

Round 4 : dc in the 1st dc ; dc in the each dc till 1st marker ; 7 dc in the next dc (marked st) ; dc in each dc till 2nd marker ; 7 dc in 2nd marked st ; dc in each dc till 3rd marker ; 7 dc in 3rd marked st ; dc in each dc till 4th marker ; 7 dc in the 4th marked st ; dc in dcs till end.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st dc.

Now move the markers to the centre st of the newly added 7 dcs at each corner.


Round 5 - 15 : Rep Round 4.  Remember to keep moving your markers up.
The picture below shows you what we’re constructing here.  So each increase will make your wallet larger in both length and widths.  You do not need to work till Round 15 – it all depends on how large you want this wallet. 
Once you’re happy with your wallet sizing, fasten off and weave in ends.

So your question .. what is a good size to stop at ? 
This rectangular piece that you’re creating will be folded 1/3rd  - so the bottom 2/3rd bit will be the lower part of the wallet, and the top 1/3rd will constitute the flap.  Now this is a general idea – working on this basic idea, play with the length you want for your flap, thereby altering the size of your wallet.



FANCY FLAP STRAP :

Here are the instructions for that little strap that is on top of the flap.. and I mulled over to figure out what to call this bit.. so we get the fancy flap strap !

So our flap has just three small row / rounds.  Depending on  how long you want your strap, you will start with that length / number of fsc.  You will then follow instructions below.  Now for convenience, I am going to write instructions as per the chart below, and the designer has started with 7 sts here.  Please remember that you do not need to start with just 7 sts though.

Start with as many fsc as required for the length of your flap strap. 

Row / Round 1 : dc in the 1st fdc and each fdc till the last dc ; 5 dc in the last dc TURN (and working on the underside of the fdc chain just made) ; dc in each fdc till the last fdc ; 4 fdc in that last fdc (which is also the 1st dc you’ve made).  Join with a sl-st to the 1st dc.

In this round, we will increase by 4 sc at each end.  So please mark two ends of the 5 dc we’ve just added.  Now we will increase in the 2nd and 4th dc’s in this 5-dc set at each corner.  So please mark these two dc’s now.

Round 2 : sc in the 1st dc and each dc till the marked dc ; 2 sc in each of the marked dc ; sc in each dc till end. Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.

Round 3 : sc in the 1st sc and each dc till end. Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.
Fasten off and weave in ends.


Attach this flap to the top of your wallet.  Then line your wallet, attach a zipper if you want (inside) and you’re good to go. J


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