Sunday, 20 March 2016

SIMPLE BABY COCOON


SIMPLE BABY COCOON

I’m making a baby cocoon for a friend, who’s expecting the pitter patter of little feet soon.  I guess there are some patterns out there, but I just thought I’d write about this particular one I’m working on.  Thanks for coming along with me on my creative journey. J

Materials used : Today I’ve used the lovely Bernat baby Softee chunky yarn,  with a 6.5 mm crochet hook
For Indians : I’d suggest using 2 – 3 strands of our lovely Indian Vardhaman Millennium yarn held together to get this thickness.

Abbreviations used :
rep : Repeat                                                                      dc : Double crochet
ch : chain                                                                       ch-sp : chain space
sp : space                                                                


Stitches used :
Magic circle : To refresh your skill, please view this easy video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLuSVyKvoUg

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3, I’d like to introduce this lovely new way of starting a dc row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video http://www.mooglyblog.com/chainless-starting-double-crochet/
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using the chainless dc start.

Baby blanket(+ other) sizing chart : https://in.pinterest.com/pin/470063279837764553/


We start our little circular cocoon at the centre bottom and work our way in rounds.  You could work in continuous rounds if you do not want the end joint line showing.
However, as it is difficult to gauge where the end is, here are two options :
1.       Keep a marker at the end of each round, moving it each round so that you keep a count of where you’re at
2.     Do a sl-st at the end of each round
Now for convenience, I am going to write it like we’re doing a sl-st at the end of each round.



Start : Round 1 : with a magic circle and 8 sc in that circle.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.

Right off the bat, I’m offering you yet another option.  Depending on the thickness of yarn used, you can use either an sc or a hdc in each stitch henceforth.  However, yet again for conveninence, I’m going to write the instructions in sc.

I am going to be using only the back loops of the stitches from this row on.  I think this will look lovely.


Working in the back loops is a little difficult, so for beginners who can otherwise easily work this cocoon pattern, I’m going to write the instructions as if we’re working full stitches.

That said, using the full stitch, instead of just back loops, will not change the pattern in any way.. so your choice for your own creativity. 

That said, using back loops gives you two different patterns for both sides of your project.


  
Round 2 : (Increase row) : 2 sc in the 1st sc and in each sc all around.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.

Round 3 : sc in the 1st sc and in each sc all around.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.

Round 4 : (Increase row) : 2 sc in the 1st sc  ; sc in the next sc ; * 2 sc in the next sc ; sc in the next sc* ; rep *to* all around.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.
We have increased by 8 sts in total.

Round 5 : sc in the 1st sc and in each sc all around.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.

Round 6 : (Increase row) : 2 sc in the 1st sc  ; sc in the next 2 sc ; * 2 sc in the next sc ; sc in the next 2 sc* ; rep *to* all around.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.
We have increased by 8 sts in total.

Round 7 : sc in the 1st sc and in each sc all around.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.

So you see how we’re working our rounds here. It’s one round of increases, increasing 8 sts ; followed by a round with no increase.

Note : Depending on the thickness of yarn, as well as the tension of your hold, you may find that the stitches are bunching up and / or your work is folding inwards.  While we do want the work to fold inwards for the cocoon, we need it to fold only towards the last few rounds.
So if you feel that this is happening, I’d suggest that you do two rounds of increase followed by one round of no increase and your work will snap back to flatness.

So continue round increases till you have a cocoon of the size you want, ending with a non-increase round.

Once you have a circular flat project, we will need to get it to close up a bit, to look like a cocoon.

You will, therefore continue without increase for about 3 – 4 rounds (once again depending on the thickness of the yarn).
There is no hard and fast rule about how ‘closed’ your cocoon needs to be.  There are general guidelines about sizing of blankets and I have given a link on the top of this blog.  This may help you try and figure out your cocoon sizing.

Once you’re done, fasten off and weave in ends. 


There’s one little baby that’s going to be a real snug-bug tonight and you’re going to have a nice warm feeling just knowing that right now! J

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Have a great day and see you soon. J