Friday, 22 January 2016

BABY’S UNIQUE 3-D LEGO BLANKET


BABY’S UNIQUE 3-D LEGO BLANKET

I’ve made two Lego blankets before this, and when I was asked for another one, I decided to do something different – after all uniqueness and creativity and Sweet Nothings Crochet are all synonymous J
The original crochet Lego brick pattern is from this lovely free you tube link, but the tweaks to make the little creation plus changing the original 2 x 4 brick and making new ones .. that’s mine!
Here are my notes as I work my own pattern.

Difficulty level : Intermediate to Advanced

Materials used : Today I’ve used our lovely Indian Vardhaman millennium DK ply acrylic yarn , with a 4 mm crochet hook

Stitches used :

fdc : Foundation Double Crochet : This is a unique way of starting a project directly with a row of double crochet stitches.  This makes your whole project neat and even.. in a way that you need to do once, to agree!  If you are familiar with fsc, you’ll wonder why you never used this start before !

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3,I’d like to introduce a lovely way of starting a double crochet row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using this chainless dc start.

“Pop”  stitch :  The designer has used the following stitch and called it a “Pop” stitch.  It is 5 trc, all in the same st… so just writing it again here for convenience.

Abbreviations used :
lp(s) : Loop(s)                                                               sc : Single crochet
dc : Double crochet                                                   sp : Space                                           
sl-st : Slip stitch                                                             fdc : Foundation Double Crochet
st(s) : Stitch(es)                                                             hk : Hook
yo : Yarn Over                                                             ch : Chain


The designer has a superb video that is totally self explanatory.  My notes here are only for the small start change, the use of the wonderful chainless dc start, and a finishing idea / difference.

For this particular creation, we’re going to use different sized bricks.  So first let’s make our bricks, and then following the chart, you can easily assemble it up.

For a 2 x 4 brick


Start with 14 fdc.  Turn.
The designer has started with a 17 ch and then dc in the 4th ch on to get a row of 14 dc.  Ever since I discovered the fdc, I find that the start this gives is easy, even and neat – and I just cannot use any other start – however, this is just a choice.

Row 1 : sc in the 1st 2 dc , 5 trc (or “pop” stitch) in the next sc ; 
*sc in the next 2 sc ; “pop” st in the next sc* ; 
rep *to* till last 2 sc ; sc in the last 2 sc.  Turn

Row 2 : dc in the 1st sc ; dc in each st till end.  Turn.

Rep Rows 1 and 2 once more.

Finishing : sc in each st till end ; 1 more sc in the corner sc ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way down ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work on the bottom of your start fdcs, do an sc in each st across ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way back up ; 1 more sc in the corner st (back where we started out).  Join with a sl-st to the first st.  Fasten off and weave in ends.

One 2 x 4 Lego brick made.


For a 1 x 4 brick


So this brick is very similar to the 2 x 4 one, just that we will not repeat rows, and we will have less stitches to go all around when doing our finishing round.

Start with 14 fdc.  Turn.
The designer has started with a 17 ch and then dc in the 4th ch on to get a row of 14 dc.  Ever since I discovered the fdc, I find that the start this gives is easy, even and neat – and I just cannot use any other start – however, this is just a choice.

Row 1 : sc in the 1st 2 dc , 5 trc (or “pop” stitch) in the next sc ; 
*sc in the next 2 sc ; “pop” st in the next sc* ; 
rep *to* till last 2 sc ; sc in the last 2 sc.  Turn

Row 2 : dc in the 1st sc ; dc in each st till end.  Turn.

Finishing : sc in each st till end ; 1 more sc in the corner sc ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way down ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work on the bottom of your start fdcs, do an sc in each st across ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way back up ; 1 more sc in the corner st (back where we started out).  Join with a sl-st to the first st.  Fasten off and weave in ends.

One 1 x 4 Lego brick made.


For a 1 x 3 brick


So this brick is very similar to the 1 x 4 one, just that we will start with a lesser number of fdc.

Start with 11 fdc.  Turn.
The designer has started with a 17 ch and then dc in the 4th ch on to get a row of 14 dc.  Ever since I discovered the fdc, I find that the start this gives is easy, even and neat – and I just cannot use any other start – however, this is just a choice.

Row 1 : sc in the 1st 2 dc , 5 trc (or “pop” stitch) in the next sc ; 
*sc in the next 2 sc ; “pop” st in the next sc* ; 
rep *to* till last 2 sc ; sc in the last 2 sc.  Turn

Row 2 : dc in the 1st sc ; dc in each st till end.  Turn.

Finishing : sc in each st till end ; 1 more sc in the corner sc ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way down ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work on the bottom of your start fdcs, do an sc in each st across ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way back up ; 1 more sc in the corner st (back where we started out).  Join with a sl-st to the first st.  Fasten off and weave in ends.

One 1 x 3 Lego brick made.


For a 2 x 2 brick


Start with 8 fdc.  Turn.

Row 1 : sc in the 1st 2 dc , 5 trc (or “pop” stitch) in the next sc ; 
[sc in the next 2 sc ; “pop” st in the next sc] ; sc in the last 2 sc.  Turn

Row 2 : dc in the 1st sc ; dc in each st till end.  Turn.

Rep Rows 1 and 2 once more.

Finishing : sc in each st till end ; 1 more sc in the corner sc ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way down ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work on the bottom of your start fdcs, do an sc in each st across ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way back up ; 1 more sc in the corner st (back where we started out).  Join with a sl-st to the first st.  Fasten off and weave in ends.

One 2 x 2 Lego brick made.


For a 1 x 2 brick

Start with 8 fdc.  Turn.

Row 1 : sc in the 1st 2 dc , 5 trc (or “pop” stitch) in the next sc ; 
[sc in the next 2 sc ; “pop” st in the next sc] ; sc in the last 2 sc.  Turn

Finishing : sc in each st till end ; 1 more sc in the corner sc ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way down ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work on the bottom of your start fdcs, do an sc in each st across ; 1 more sc in the corner st ;
Turn your work at 90° and work an sc in each horizontal bar of dc all the way back up ; 1 more sc in the corner st (back where we started out).  Join with a sl-st to the first st.  Fasten off and weave in ends.

One 1 x 2 Lego brick made.
  
Once you’ve made all the lego bricks / blocks you need, you will see the beautiful join that the designer has made – the white chains showing up on top add a lovely edging that make this more like a lego pattern.  Kudos to this beautiful design and more so that this wonderful person has shared this all for free !!

Now I thought I would add a row of dc’s around the full blanket to give it that little bit of an extra width – which meant that instead of the cute little chain joint that the designer has shown, I had to make a slight variation in my join between Lego rectangles blocks.  So this is what I’ve done.  Lets imagine two rectangles A & B.  So I’ve attached my white yarn at the corner of Rectangle A, and sc in that same st , ch 1, sc in the corner st of Rectangle B ; *ch 1, sc in the next st of Rectangle A ; ch 1, sc in the next st of Rectangle B* ; rep *to* till you are at the last corner of your rectangle.  Fasten off and weave in end.

Rep this for all rectangles till you have them joined in the pattern you wish.  Then I ran one round of dc’s all around the blanket, with 3 dc in each edge (or you could do a 2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc corner) ; and then joining with sl-st at the 1st st.  Fasten off and weave in ends.  Block as per yarn specifications.

I am also considering doing a rep of Rows 1 and 2 all around the edge, giving it this white lego bricked edging .. but that depends on  how much (white) yarn I have left. J

You could also do a nice lacy border, there here is a chart for that.
I found this on a Pinterest page https://www.pinterest.com/pin/470063279834786931/

BORDER :
Before we start on our pattern, let’s re-attach our border colour yarn to any corner, and run a round of sc / hdc or dc in each stitch all the way around your blanket, and 3 dc in the four corners. 
I’m writing it assuming that you’re working a row of dc around.

Round 1 : 2 dc in the 1st corner, dc in each st all the way till the end ; 
(3 dc in the next corner ; dc in each st all the way down the row till next corner) ; 
rep (to) till the last corner ; dc in the last corner and join with a sl-st to the 1st st.

In this row, we will work till the corners, and use only the center dc of that 3-dc corner set.  So if you ensure that you tweak the stitches in such a way that you get the 3 dc for this following round in the centre dc. 

Round 2 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ; (ch 1, sk next dc, dc in the next dc) ; 
rep (to) till the end ; ch 1 and join with a sl-st to the 1st dc.

You are now in the one corner and in the 1st of the three dc in that corner set.

Round 3 : sc in the 1st ch-1 sp , (ch 7, sk next 2 dc and ch-1 sp, sc in the next ch-1 sp) ; 
rep (to) all the way around ; ch 7 and join with a sl-st in the 1st st.

Round 4 : sl-st into the 1st corner ch-7 sp ,  sc in the  same ch-7 sp ;  ch 7 and sc in the same corner ch-7 sp ;  (ch 7, sc in the next ch-7 sp) ; 
*rep (to) all the way till next ch-7 corner sp ; ch 7, sc in the same ch-7 corner sp* ; 
rep *to* all around, ch 7 and join with a sl-st in the 1st st.

Round 5 : sl-st into the 1st corner ch-7 sp ,  sc in the  same ch-7 sp ;  ch 5 and sc in the same corner ch-7 sp ;  (ch 5, sc in the next ch-7 sp) ; 
*rep (to) all the way till next ch-7 corner sp ; ch 5, sc in the same ch-7 corner sp* ; 
rep *to* all around, ch 5 and join with a sl-st in the 1st st.

Round 6 : sl-st into the 1st corner ch-5 sp ,  15 dc in the same ch-5 corner sp ; 
(sc in the next ch-5 sp ; [ch 5, sc in the next ch-5 sp] ; rep [to] once ; 9 dc in the next ch-5 sp) ; 
*rep (to) till next ch-5 corner sp ; 15 dc in the next ch-5 corner sp*  ; 
rep *to* all around and join with a sl-st to the 1st st.

Round 7 : sl-st into the 1st dc of the 1st corner,  dc in the 1st dc ; (ch 1, dc in the next dc) ; rep (to) in each corner dc ; ch 5, sc in the next ch-5 sp ; [rep (to) in the next 9 dc ;  sc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 5, sc in the next ch-5 sp] ; *rep [to] till next ch-5 corner sp ; dc in the next dc, rep (to) in the next  14 dc in the next ch-5 corner sp*  rep *to* all around and join with a sl-st to the 1st st.

In our final round, we’ll use a 3-ch picot.  Our picot is (ch 3, sl-st into the 1st ch).
How to do a picot stitch : A neat video link to refresh this procedure. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GGlzZZl3I8

Round 8 : sl-st into the 1st dc of the 1st corner,  dc in the 1st dc ; 
(picot in the next ch-1 sp, dc in the next dc) ; 
rep (to) in the next 13 dc ; sc in the next ch-5 sp ; 
[rep (to) in the next 9 dc ;  sc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 5, sc in the next ch-5 sp] ; 
*rep [to] till next ch-5 corner sp ; dc in the next dc, rep (to) in the next  14 dc in the next ch-5 corner sp*;
 rep *to* all around and join with a sl-st to the 1st st.
  
You now have a choice for starting, joining and finishing your blanket.. and you will have one really cute project at the end of it all J



MOTIFS :
Lego bricks come in these square / rectangle forms and then there are these little Lego pieces that will add the 3-D effect and make your blanket "POP" up.  
To do this, we need leaves, trees and flowers.. so this is what I’ve done.

That centre pink brick is the base for a lotus ; on the left side, I thought a few bulrushes / grass would look good and on the right some 3D leaves coming off that tree. So here are the motifs for that.

LOTUS FLOWER


Using the pattern chart from this Pinterest page link, here is my write up for it

Magic circle : To refresh your skill, please view this easy video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLuSVyKvoUg
Start : with a magic circle and 8 sc in that circle.  Join with a sl-st to the 1st st.

Petal 1 : 11 ch from the 1st sc ; Turn and working on the chain we’ve just made ;
(sc ; hdc  ; 6 dc ; hdc ; sc) in the ch-10 ; sl-st into the sc of the magic circle ;

Continue on to Petal 2 – so start with a sl-st into the next sc on magic circle and 11 ch from that sc ; and rep (to) on that ch-11 just made ; 
*continue on to Petal 3, with sl-st and then ch and the (to)* ; 
rep *to* till last petal complete.  
Fasten off and weave in ends.
One little flower complete.

If you want a larger flower, then start with a larger number of stitches in the magic circle and work more petals all around.

LEAF 1 (Palm leaf)



Using the pattern chart from this Pinterest page link, here is my write up for it

Start : with a magic circle and 5 sc in that circle.  Pull to close but leave in a semi circle, not closing circle as we usually do..

Row 1 : hdc in the 1st sc ; (ch 2, hdc in the next sc) ; rep (to) till last sc.  Turn.

Row 2 : sl-st into the 1st ch-2 sp ; (2 hdc , ch 3, 2 hdc) all in the 1st ch-2 sp ; 
*ch 1, rep (to)* in next ch-2 sp  ; 
rep *to* till last ch-2 sp.  Turn.

Row 3 : sl-st into the 1st ch-2 sp ; (3 hdc , ch 3, 3 hdc) all in the 1st ch-2 sp ; 
*ch 1, rep (to)* in next ch-2 sp  ; 
rep *to* till last ch-2 sp.  Turn.

Rep Row 3, increasing one hdc each end of each leaf, till you have a leaf of the length you need. You can then fasten off and leave a tail for attachment to the top of the palm tree.

Now if you see the chart, you will see that there is one leaf that is a lot longer than the rest – so if you want to do this, you will need to increase all your leaves to a certain level, and then continue increasing only on that one leaf back and forth, for the length you need for that particular leaf.

LEAF 2




dc 2-tog : Double crochet 2-tog : [yo, insert hk in st or ch-sp, yo and pull up a lp ; yo and draw through 2 lps] 2 times (3 lps on hk) ; yo, draw through all lps on hk.  One dc 2-tog made.

Using the pattern chart from this Pinterest page link, here is my write up for it

Start : with 11 fsc.  Turn.

We will now complete our little leaf in one single movement.  We will work from one end, and when we reach the other end, we will work around the end of the fsc chain and then work under it.

Row 1 : sc in the 1st fsc ; hdc in the next 2 fsc ; dc in the next 2 fsc ; 2 dc in the next 5 fsc ; 9 dc in the next fsc ; Turn and working along the bottom of the fsc chain ; 2 dc in the next fsc ; 
(dc 2-tog over the next 2 fsc) ; 
rep (to) once ; dc in the next 2 fsc ; hdc in the next 2 fsc ; sc in the last fsc.  
Fasten off and keep a long tail for attachment to the left of the leafy bank.

Make as many as you wish to add some 3-D effect to your beautiful creation.

Final Finishing :

Using the chart, attach your pieces together and make this beautiful crochet Lego brick scene. Once the basic pink (for base of lotus flower) and green for grass and palm leaves has been made with the Lego bricks, I've then attached on the flower and leaves to the centre of the "Lego brick", just as one would with the original plastic Lego bricks.

I've attached  on cute googly eyes for the duckies, but you could embroider them in as well.

The excel worksheet shows you the different sized Lego bricks, which is self explanatory.

A small difference that I used for attachment of bricks here was to use the same colour as the brick for attachment (as against white) so that it seems seemless.

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Have a great day and see you soon. J

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