Tuesday, 25 October 2016

A NEAT LONG SHELLED COAT

free crochet pattern, long crochet coat, crochet shell pattern

A NEAT LONG SHELLED COAT

Once again I return to my old fave (and obviously that of my client’s as well!) .. 
Shells !  This long jacket can be made into a short bolero like creation and you can actually make this into a top as well.  
One set of instructions that can create three outfits.. Cool, huh?

I was really excited when I found that the pin lead to something that read ‘step-by-step-how-to-crochet’ ; but sadly this blog link only has the finished product photograph and a chart.  I guess something was lost in translation.

I am not sure if there is a written explanation for this, but these are my notes as I work on this project for my client.

Thanks for joining me once again as we work on and discover this new pattern together. 

Do check my long pinterest “to-do” list for little ladies jackets / boleros at https://in.pinterest.com/shyamanivas/boleros-to-make/
And

Inspired by this photo and https//yarncrochetsweater.blogspot.in/2016/01/  , here are my pattern notes.



Materials usedToday I’ve used ~ 200 gms of our lovely Indian Oswal Cashmilon 4-ply acrylic yarn with a 3.5 mm crochet hook ;
Optional : Stitch marker

Size made :  34” bust ; 32” length

Difficulty level : Intermediate Skill level

Stitches used :
fsc : Foundation Single Crochet : To refresh your skill on the fsc, please view this superb video by Tamara Kelly at the link  http://www.mooglyblog.com/foundation-single-crochet-fsc/

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual dc row start with ch 2 or ch 3, I’d like to introduce this lovely new way of starting a dc row. Do take a look at this self explanatory video at http://www.mooglyblog.com/chainless-starting-double-crochet/ .  In case you are unhappy with this start, do continue with the usual ch 2 or ch 3 start.  However, all instructions are given assuming that you’re using this chain-less dc start. 


How to join with single crochet : Check the links below :

How to join with whip stich : Check the links below :


Abbreviations used :  Using U.S Terminology

fsc : Foundation single crochet                                 ch : Chain
dc : Double crochet                                              sp(s) : Space(s)
st(s) : Stitch(es)                                                       hk : Hook
lp : Loop(s)                                                                yo : Yarn Over
sk : Skip                                                                      sc : Single crochet
trc : Triple / Treble crochet



Instructions : (Using U.S Terminology)

crochet duster coat, crochet jacket


Before we start on our journey, as usual, let’s see what we’re going to do here. 

The pattern is a neat and pretty simple shell pattern that uses trc or Triple / Treble crochet.  Now I am going to write the pattern out as charted, but I am going to be playing around with the stitches in my own creation.  I want it to be less lacy and give the wearer a little warmth, while being a light, filigree coat as well – so I am going to change some of the trc to dc , and change the ch-sps too for my own creation.
However, I am going to write the instructions as charted.

The pattern is worked in panels – two for the front , one piece for the back and two for for the sleeves.
The front & back panels are rectangular and the armhole is not curved. 
You can opt for a circular neckline (as in the photograph) or you could work all the way to the neckline and then allow it to flop back down like a collar.

Our rectangle starts in a straight line from the armhole sides and we will work towards the centre placket for the two front pieces.  For the back, we will work one continuous rectangle from side to side (or armhole to armhole).
The sleeves are similarly two rectangles.






Back
Start Row 1 : with a row of fsc in multiples of 18 + 9 for the length you need from the full length of the jacket.
Remember there is a small border that will also add to the length and width (border will add to width only for the front panels).

Row 2 : trc in the 1st fsc  ; ch 4, sk next 4 fsc, sc in the next fsc  ;
*ch 8, sk next 8 fsc, sc in the next fsc* ;
rep *to* till the last 4 fsc ; 
ch 4, sk next 4 fsc, trc in the last fsc.  Turn.

Row 3 : trc in the 1st trc  ; [trc in the next ch-4 sp ; 
(ch 2, trc in the same ch-4 sp) ; rep (to) once] ;
*ch 2, sc in the next ch-8 sp ; ch 2, trc in the next ch-8 sp ; rep (to) 5 times* ;
rep *to* till the last ch-4 sp ; 
rep [to] in the last ch-4 sp.  Turn.

Row 4 : trc in the 1st trc  ;
[ch 5, sk next 2 trc + ch-2 sp, trc in the next ch-2 sp] ;
*ch 5, sk next 2 trc and two ch-2 sps, trc in the next ch-2 sp ; 
rep [to] 2 times* ; 
rep *to* till the end, ending with one rep of [to].

Row 5 : dc in the 1st trc  ; sk next ch-4 sp , [trc in the next ch-4 sp ; 
(ch 2, trc in the same ch-4 sp) ; rep (to) 4 times] ;
*ch 2, sc in the next trc ; ch 2, sk next ch-4 sp, trc in the next ch-4 sp ; 
rep (to) 5 times* ;
rep *to* till the last ch-4 sp ; 
ch 2, sk the last ch-4 sp, dc in the last trc.  Turn.

Row 6 : trc in the 1st dc  ; ch 2, sk next trc, trc in the next ch-2 sp ;
[ch 5, sk next 2 trc + ch-2 sp, trc in the next ch-2 sp] ; rep [to] once ;
*ch 5, sk next 2 trc and two ch-2 sps, trc in the next ch-2 sp ; 
rep [to] 2 times* ; 
rep *to* till the last ch-2 sp ; 
trc in that last ch-2 sp ; ch 2, trc in the last dc.

Row 7 : trc in the 1st trc  ; trc in the next ch-2 sp ; 
(ch 2, trc in the same ch-2 sp) ; 
rep (to) once ; ch 2, sc in the next trc ;
*ch 2, [trc in the next ch-5 sp ; (ch 2, trc in the same ch-5 sp) ; 
rep (to) 5 times] ;
ch 2, sc in the next trc* ;
rep *to* till the last ch-2 sp ; 
ch 2 , trc in the last ch-2 sp ; rep (to) 2 times in the last ch-2 sp ; trc in the last trc.  Turn.

Rep Rows 4 – 7  ; ending with a Row 4 or 6 ; till you have half the round chest / waist / hip measure (whichever is the largest of the measures, as we need this to close around the front)
Now as we’re working the back section, we will work a straight-line ending row.

So for our last row, we’ll work a row of sc in stitches and ch-sps, ensuring that we end with the same number of stitches that you started with.

Fasten off and weave in ends.

Front :  Make 2
The main difference with the fronts and back is the ending.  You will end with either a Row 4 or 6 but do not work a row of sc after this, as we’ll work a border all around the two sides and bottom of the work.

We also need a small decrease for the neckline, so start and work the pattern as for the back, but when you reach the neckline, follow the instructions for the Neckline decrease below.  

Neckline decrease idea : 
As you’ve worked so many rows of this pattern by now, you know how simple this is.  So here’s what I have done for my neckline. 
Decide the depth & width of your neckline and place a marker at that point.

Remember that we have a small border along the top of the neckline as well, which will add to the depth (or take away from the depth) of your neckline, so please factor that in as well when placing your marker.
So your question : How do I factor that extra border in?  We will be working about 4 rows (again depending on how broad you want this border) of dc along the neckline edge.  So check how many inches 4-dc rows are with the yarn and work-tension that you have.  So say your 4-dc row = 2” and you want a finish of 7” from the shoulders (for neckline), then you will work till you are about 9” from the neckline, and you will then work the 2” of border to give you a finish of 7” from shoulder.  Got it?

As I always encourage creativity and difference, may I also suggest that you could work a hdc , e-sc or sc in each stitch around the border as well (instead of a dc), and if you are going to do that, then obviously it is this stitch that you will need to swatch and check… but you did know that. 

Right then, you will work the pattern all the way to that point and back down to the base of your jacket.  You will get a neat square neckline by just doing this.

If your marker happens to fall in the middle of a shell, then you work half the number of stitches in that shell – so instead of 6 dc + ch-1 sps, you will work 3 dc and ch-1 sps and then 1 dc for the last st (as we do for the start /end of our alternate shell rows here)

If your marker happens to fall in the sc between 2 shells, then you will work a dc in that sc and then work back down to the base of your jacket.

The most important thing is that your write whatever you are doing for one side down so that you are able to mirror these instructions for the other side as well.

Once you’ve done both sides of the front, you should attach first the shoulders and then the sides.

Remember when attaching sides, there is a sleeve that needs to fit in, so keep that space for the sleeve that we are about to work in now.

You could also decide to work the two sleeve panels as well, and then attach the whole creation in one single movement. 
Choices.. decisions.. as usual 

Sleeves :  Make 2
The main difference with the sleeves and the front/back panels is the number of stitches. 
Calculate the round armhole measure and work a pair of rectangular panels for the sleeves.
You will end with either a Row 4 or 6 but do not work a row of sc after this, as we’ll work a border all around the bottom of the sleeve panel as well.

Joining :  
Once you’ve completed the two sleeeves, two front panels and one back panel, you could join the shoulders, and then the sleeves and sides.

We will then work a shelled border along the fronts and bottom of your coat, as well as the ends of your sleeves.

Shelled border :
The shelled border is the same pattern as the pattern for Rows 5 & 7.  So starting in one corner of the front panel, work your way down that panel, around the base of your jacket and up the other front panel. 
You will then work the same shelled border around the two sleeve edges as well.

Neckline border :


The neckline border is a row of plain dc.

Attach your yarn at one end of the front panel, and we will work back acoss the back and then across the other front panel.

Work a row of dc / hdc or sc all around the neckline, keeping it in the square shape you’ve made or by rounding off the square ends and making it a little rounded.
Ensure that you work as many rows as needed to bring the neckline up to the height you need.
Fasten off and weave in ends.

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