Saturday, 4 April 2015

FULL SLEEVED LATTICE BOLERO

FULL SLEEVED LATTICE BOLERO

This is a cool pattern.. four line repeat with picots thrown in for good measure.. so lots of little exciting things here. 

The pattern is made as one back, two fronts, and two sleeves.. then you make a border for the front that goes from one side (of front) around the back (like a collar) and then down the other side of front.. and so like I said before.. lots of exciting stuff happening here.

I’m going to copy the pattern exactly, without any change in numbers.. and looks like this one is going to fit a Size 36” perfectly.. which is great then.. as that’s my intention J

So we'll make five rectangles – two each for the fronts, two for the sleeves and one for back.

Pattern inspiration photo below and link :  http://vyazu.ru/goluboj-azhurnyj-zhaket/



Materials used : Today I’ve used about 3 (100 gm) balls of the lovely Vardhaman Millenium DK-ply acrylic yarn,  with a 4  mm crochet hook.

Size made : 34 - 36” ; Length : 16”
Gauge : I small shell (across)  = 1 “ ; 1 dc row (high) = ½”

 Abbreviations used :
fdc : Foundation double crochet                                dc : Double crochet
ch : chain                                                                         ch-sp : chain space
sp : space                                                                          rep : Repeat


Stitches used :
fdc : Foundation Double Crochet : This is a unique way of starting a project directly with a row of double crochet stitches.  This makes your whole project neat and even.. in a way that you need to do once, to agree!  If you are familiar with fsc, you’ll wonder why you never used this start before !

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3, I’d like to introduce this lovely new way of starting a dc row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video http://www.mooglyblog.com/chainless-starting-double-crochet/
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using the chainless dc start.

Chainless Treble crochet : A really lovely way to start a row of stitches without the ch 3 / ch 4 start ; this is the chainless treble crochet.  This unique way of starting makes your project even - in a way that needs to be seen for you to agree with me.  Do visit the self explanatory link to learn this fascinating new start. 
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-3 or ch-4 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using the chainless dc start.

Small shell : (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) all in the same st or ch-sp

Picot : (sc, ch 3, sl-st in same sc) all in the same st or ch-sp. 
Pl view instructions at http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-crochet-a-picot-stitch.html for a refresher of what a 3-ch picot is.

Quick analysis of what we’re going to do here today.  We start at the base of our bolero and then work upwards to the shoulders – for both the front and the back. The beauty is we go straight up to the top, without any shaping for the armhole, and then we make sleeves, which are also simple neat rectangles.  Then to add some crochet bling, we add on these really lovely lacy edges / borders and transform this bolero into something really special.
So let’s get started.

BACK  : Our pattern repeat count is 7 + 2.  So start with the number of stitches you need for the width of the back of your bolero.

Row 1 : Start with a multiple of 7 fdc + 1. Turn.

Row 2 : dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk 3 dc, small shell in the next dc ; 
*ch 5, sk 6 dc, small shell in the next dc* ; rep from *to* till last 4 dc ; 
ch 3, dc in last dc. Turn.

From this row on, we’ll work all our shells in the ch-2 sp of the shell.

Row 3 : sc on 1st dc ; ch 2, sk 1st ch-3 sp, small shell in small shell ; 
*ch 2, sc in next ch-5 sp ; ch 2, small shell in next small shell * ; 
rep from *to* till last small shell ; ch 2, sc on last dc.  Turn.

Row 4 : sc in 1st sc ; ch 2, sk 1st ch-2 sp, small shell in small shell; 
*ch 2, sc in sc ; ch 2, small shell in next small shell* ; 
rep from *to* till last small shell ; ch 2, sc on last sc.  Turn.

Row 5 : rep Row 4

Row 6 : dc in 1st sc ; ch 3, sc in 1st ch-2 sp (of 1st small shell) ; 
*ch 6, sk next two ch-2 sps & 1 sc, sc in next ch-2 sp (of next small shell)* ; 
rep from *to* till last ch-2 sp of last shell ; ch 3, dc in last sc.  Turn.

Row 7 : dc in 1st dc, dc in each ch , sc and dc till end.  Turn. 

Row 8 : hdc in 1st dc ; ch 3, sk 2 dc, sc in next 3 dc ;
*ch 6, sk 4 dc,  sc in next 3 dc * ; 
rep from *to* till end ; ch 3, sk 2 dc, hdc in last dc.  Turn.

From this row on we’ll use our picot : (sc, ch 3, sl-st in same sc) all in the same st or ch-sp. 

Row 9 : sc in 1st hdc ; ch 4, sk 1st sc, picot in next sc ;
*ch 4, sk next sc, sc ch-6 sp ; ch 4, sk next sc, picot in next sc* ; 
rep from *to* till last sc-set ; ch 4, sc in last hdc.  Turn.

Row 10 : sc in 1st sc ; sc in next 2 ch ; 
ch 6, sk picot, sk 2 ch, sc in next 2 ch, sc in next sc, sc in next 2 ch ; 
*ch 6, sk picot, sk 2 ch, sc in next 2 ch, sc in next sc, sc in next 2 ch* ; 
rep from *to* till before last picot ; ch 6, sc in last 2 ch, sc in last sc.  Turn. 

Row 11 : picot in 1st sc ; ch 4, sc in ch-6 sp ; ch 4, sk 2 sc, picot in next sc ;
*ch 4, sc in ch-6 sp ; ch 4, sk 2 sc, picot in next sc* ; rep from *to* till end.  Turn.

Row 12 : dc in the 1st sc (allow the picot to stand out, and go into the sc that this picot stems from) ; ch 3, sk 2 ch, 2 sc in ch-4 sp, sc in sc, 2 sc in ch-4 sp ;
*ch 6, sk 2 ch, picot and next 2 ch, 2 sc in next ch-4 sp, sc in sc, 2 sc in next ch-4 sp* ; 
rep from *to* 3 times ; 
ch 3, dc in last sc (again allow the picot to stand out, and go into the sc that this picot stems from).  Turn.

Row 13 : sc in 1st dc ; ch 4, sk 1st 2 sc, picot in next sc ;
*ch 4, sk next 2 sc, sc in ch-6 sp ; ch 4, sk 1st 2 sc, picot in next sc* ; rep from *to* 3 times, ch 4, sc in last dc.  Turn.

Rep Rows 10 – 13 till your project measures length needed (i.e as measured from shoulder down)


FRONT  : Our pattern is nearly the same for front and back.  The only difference is that there are two parts for front, so you will make a mirror image for right and left sides, and also there are two lovely borders that we will work as a continuous border, from one front side, up the neck and then back of neck, down the other side of the front.  
So when you are making the front side(s), ensure that you calculate for this border before you make the fronts.
Now the designer has used (a) a thinner yarn than I have and (b) worked the border such that it just touches.  I have a thicker yarn and my border almost overlaps.  Let's see what happens when you do your project now. 

So the first border is the same width as the base of your back (i.e the pattern between Rows 1-7  – and then the 2nd border is about the same width – so now  you have an idea of how wide (or thin?) you need to make your front pieces.
 The other thing that we’re going to do here is that we make this thin strip for the front – and then we work back down making Border 1 on one side of the front strip before we finish one side.  We will then make the other side the same way – join the front(s) and back at shoulder and sides, and then work a continuous front 2nd border all along the fronts and neck to finish.

After completion of the front(s) and back, we will make the rectangular sleeve and then attach that to this part.

Back and one front 

 Row 1 : Start with a multiple of 7 fdc + 2. Turn. 

Row 2 : dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk 3 dc, small shell in the next dc ; 
*ch 5, sk 6 dc, small shell in the next dc* ; 
rep from *to* till last 4 dc ; ch 3, dc in last dc. Turn.

From this row on, we’ll work all our shells in the ch-2 sp of the shell.

Row 3 : sc on 1st dc ; ch 2, sk 1st ch-3 sp, small shell in small shell ; 
*ch 2, sc in next ch-5 sp ; ch 2, small shell in next small shell * ; 
rep from *to* till last small shell ; ch 2, sc on last dc.  Turn.

Row 4 : sc in 1st sc ; ch 2, sk 1st ch-2 sp, small shell in small shell; 
*ch 2, sc in sc ; ch 2, small shell in next small shell* ; 
rep from *to* till last small shell ; ch 2, sc on last sc.  Turn.

Row 5 : rep Row 4

Row 6 : trc in 1st sc ; ch 3, sc in 1st ch-2 sp (of 1st small shell) ; 
*ch 6, sk next two ch-2 sps & 1 sc, sc in next ch-2 sp (of next small shell)* ; 
rep from *to* till last ch-2 sp of last shell ; ch 3, dtr in last sc.  Turn.

Row 7 : dc in 1st trc, dc in each ch , sc and trc till end.  Turn. 

Row 8 : hdc in 1st dc ; ch 3, sk 2 dc, sc in next 3 dc ;
*ch 6, sk 4 dc,  sc in next 3 dc * ; rep from *to* till end ; ch 3, hdc in last dc.  Turn.

From this row on we’ll use our picot : (sc, ch 3, sl-st in same sc) all in the same st or ch-sp. 

Row 9 : sc in 1st hdc ; ch 4, sk 1st sc, picot in next sc ;
*ch 4, sk next sc, sc ch-6 sp ; ch 4, sk next sc, picot in next sc* ; 
rep from *to* till last sc-set ; ch 4, sc in last hdc.  Turn.

Row 10 : sc in 1st sc ; sc in next 2 ch ; ch 6, sk picot, sk 2 ch, sc in next 2 ch, sc in next sc, sc in next 2 ch ; *ch 6, sk picot, sk 2 ch, sc in next 2 ch, sc in next sc, sc in next 2 ch* ; 
rep from *to* till before last picot ; ch 6, sc in last 2 ch, sc in last sc.  Turn. 

Row 11 : picot in 1st sc ; ch 4, sc in ch-6 sp ; ch 4, sk 2 sc, picot in next sc ;
*ch 4, sc in ch-6 sp ; ch 4, sk 2 sc, picot in next sc* ; 
rep from *to* till end.  Turn.

Row 12 : dc in the 1st sc (allow the picot to stand out, and go into the sc that this picot stems from) ; ch 3, sk 2 ch, 2 sc in ch-4 sp, sc in sc, 2 sc in ch-4 sp ;
*ch 6, sk 2 ch, picot and next 2 ch, 2 sc in next ch-4 sp, sc in sc, 2 sc in next ch-4 sp* ; 
rep from *to* 3 times ; ch 3, dc in last sc (again allow the picot to stand out, and go into the sc that this picot stems from).  Turn.

Row 13 : sc in 1st dc ; ch 4, sk 1st 2 sc, picot in next sc ;
*ch 4, sk next 2 sc, sc in ch-6 sp ; ch 4, sk 1st 2 sc, picot in next sc* ; 
rep from *to* 3 times, ch 4, sc in last dc.  Turn.

Rep Rows 10 – 13 till your project measures length needed (i.e as measured from shoulder down)

Once done with one side of the front, we will continue back down the front lapel of your work to make the 1st of two borders.  This border is actually similar to Rows 1-7 but to start, we need to make a base row of scs. 

So turning your work at 90° and working along the front lapel, work sc’s evenly along the edge in multiples of 7 plus 1.

Rep Rows 2 – 7 , but in Row 2, you will substitute the word “dc” with “sc”.  In Row 1 of the original pattern, we’ve done a row of dc’s, so in Row 2, we say dc in dc.  Here for this border though, we’ve just done a row of sc’s.. so it’s just that small difference, but the same pattern.. got it, right J

Great.  Now join up – so join the shoulders and the sides, leaving an opening for the armhole.
Fasten off and weave in ends.

SLEEVE : (Make two)
Our sleeves follow the same pattern as the fronts – so once again Rep Rows 1 -13 till you have the sleeve of the required length.
Note : As we’re joining the sleeve to the straight armhole edge (i.e not the usual curved armhole edge), remember that you will need to adjust (reduce) the length needed.  This straight armhole edge adds a few centimetres at the shoulder end, so your sleeve needs to be a tad shorter than you would usually make it.  That said, this pattern shows a 3/4th sleeve, so if yours ends up a tad longer, well.. that’s creativity J

BORDER EDGING :
Our border is done in one continuous move, so we will start at the bottom front of the lapel, and work all around in one round.
Now each little floret of our border is worked individually (like a motif of sorts) , moving up and down in a seemingly confusing combination – so do pay attention to all the information within brackets / parenthesis and also take a look at the chart given alongside.
You will be working one part away from the body of your work, and then joining that with a sl-st to the body of your work.
We will also be using a decorative 3-ch picot = (ch 3, sl-st into the 1st ch).

1st motif : ch 13 (counts as 10 ch + 1 dc) ;
(turning at 90° and working along the ch just made), 15 dc on the 10 ch just made ;
sl-st into the end dc at the corner in the body of your work ;  

(turning and working along the dc’s just made), [ch 4, sk 3 dc, sc in the next dc] ; rep [to] 2 times ; ch 4, sk 3 dc, ch 2 and dc in the last dc
(so we’re in the centre of that last ch-4 sp) ;

(turning and working along the ch-4 sps just made), {ch 5, sc in the next ch-4 sp} ; rep {to} 2 times ; ch 5, sk corner and next dc on main body of work, and sc in the next dc ;
Sl-st in the next dc (on main body) ; sc in the next dc ;

(turning and working away from body)  #ch 7, sk 1st ch-5 sp , dc 2-tog in the next ch-4 sp# ;  rep #to# 2 times ; ch 7, hdc into the dc from the 1st set of 15 dc made ;

(turning and working along the ch-7 sps just made, we will work 3 different combination of stitches A , B and C),

((work A = sc , hdc , 2 dc + picot , 3 dc + picot , 2 dc , hdc , sc)) all in the next ch-7 sp ;
sc on top of the next dc 2-tog ;

[( work B =  sc, hdc , 2 dc + picot , 3 dc + picot , 3 dc + picot , 2 dc, hdc , sc)] in the next ch-7 sp ;
sc on top of the next dc 2-tog ; work B in the next ch-7 sp ; sc on top of the next dc 2-tog ;
work A in the next ch-7 sp ; sc on top of the next dc 2-tog ;

{(work C = sc, hdc, 3 dc + picot , 3 dc , hdc , sc)} in the last ch-7 sp ;
Sc in the next dc (of the main body)

Great.. we’ve completed the first of our continuous motifs.  Now the rest also follow in the similar fashion – the small change being that we need to now join one motif to the next, and remember that on our very last motif (i.e once we come all the way around back to this motif), we will need to join that last motif to this 1st one we’ve just made.

To join our motifs, we will be sl-st into the picots of the earlier motif made. I also suggest we use the chainless dc start for a neat finish, and hence though the pattern will show a start of 13 ch = 10 ch + 1st dc, I will suggest we use just a 10 ch start.

2nd  motif : (On main body, sl-st into the next 5 dc and start on that same 5th dc) ch 10 ; skipping first picot, sl-st into the next picot ;

(turning at 90° and working along the ch just made), 16 dc on the 10 ch just made ;
Sk next dc (on main body of work) sl-st into the next dc ; 

(turning and working along the dc’s just made), [ch 4, sk 3 dc, sc in the next dc] ; rep [to] 3 times ; ch 2, sl-st into the next picot ;

(turning and working along the ch-4 sps just made), sk 1st ch-2 sp , {ch 5, sc in the next ch-4 sp} ; rep {to} 3 times ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc on main body of work, and sc in the next dc ;
Sl-st in the next 2 dc (on main body) ; sc in the next dc ;

(turning and working away from body)  , #ch 7, sk 1st ch-3 sp , dc 2-tog in the next ch-5 sp# ;  rep #to# 2 times ; ch 7, sc in the last ch-5 sp ; dc in the next  picot ;

(turning and working along the ch-7 sps just made, we will work 3 different combination of stitches A , B and C),

((work A = sc , hdc , 2 dc + picot , 3 dc + picot , 2 dc , hdc, sc)) all in the next ch-7 sp ;
sc on top of the next dc 2-tog ;

[( work B =  sc, hdc , 2 dc + picot , 3 dc + picot , 3 dc + picot , 2 dc, hdc, sc)] in the next ch-7 sp ; sc on top of the next dc 2-tog ; work B in the next ch-7 sp ; sc on top of the next dc 2-tog ;
{(work C = sc, hdc, 3 dc + picot , 3 dc , hdc , sc)} in the last ch-7 sp ;
Sc in the next dc (of the main body)

So we will use our 1st motif on all the corners, as we have (as you can see) a five-floret motif for corners, and the 2nd motif for all the straight sections of our work (as we have a four-floret here).

Continue using these motifs all around, and ensure that you join up the 1st corner motif to the last one you wil make.

Fasten off and weave in ends.  Give yourself a big pat on the back as this one has really been a great project – especially the up and down edging – but totally worth it, I’m sure you’ll agree.




Enjoyed this ?? I sure did.. come back right here for more freebie patterns

If you're visiting me here for the first time, and have liked the experience, do add me to your mailing list (for your convenience) , and all my future free patterns will come straight to your mail box.  

I’d appreciate if you could credit my blog (and link the original pattern link) when you make your own bolero.  Thanks.


Have a great day and see you soon. J


I have a few boleros already made, and just in case you want a dekho at those free patterns … here you go