Saturday, 11 June 2016

A REALLY NEAT MOTIF YOKE



A REALLY NEAT MOTIF YOKE

I was gifted one ball of this really lovely HP knitting cotton yarn that I’ve just been itching to try out.  I think it’s not sufficient for a top and may not even work for a yoke – so this is what I am going to do with it .J

I had all these plain t-shirts that were getting on my nerves, so I thought I’d D.I.Y-it a bit.  I found this really interesting small square motif, and I plan on linking a few of them up to get a neckline n shoulders.

As I work on this pattern, I’ve written down my notes that I share with you. https://in.pinterest.com/pin/470063279837342291/


Materials used : Today I’ve used the superbly soft HP knitting cotton yarn with a 3 mm crochet hook.
For Indians : HP knitting cotton is an Indian yarn, available online on Facebook. However, you could use our Indian Anchor, Red rose or Shilpa knitting cotton.

Skill level: Intermediate to Advanced.

Abbreviations used :  (Using U.S terminology)
fdc : Foundation double crochet                                dc : Double crochet
ch(s) : chain(s                                                                ch-sp : chain space
sp(s) : space(s)                                                              rep : Repeat
hk : hook                                                                        yo : Yarn over
sk : Skip                                                                           lp(s) : Loop(s)
st(s) : Stitch(es)


Stitches used :  (Using U.S terminology)
Magic circle :To refresh your skill, please view this easy video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLuSVyKvoUg

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3, I’d like to introduce this lovely new way of starting a dc row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video http://www.mooglyblog.com/chainless-starting-double-crochet/
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using the chainless dc start.

dc 3-tog : Double crochet 3-tog : [yo, insert hk in st or ch-sp, yo and pull up a lp ; yo and draw through 2 lps] 3 times (4 lps on hk) ; yo, draw through all lps on hk.  One dc 3-tog made.

How to do a picot stitch : A neat video link to refresh this procedure. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GGlzZZl3I8 .  We will use the ch-3 picot for our project here today – which is (ch 3, sl-st into the 1st ch)





Instructions for motif yoke : (Using U.S terminology)

So how are we working this yoke?
I am going to work this first motif and then join a few along to get the width of chest.  I will then add them to make the shoulder(s) and the back of the chest, leaving an opening for the neck.

If you’re feeling adventurous enough, and/or really like this motif, go on and make a full top of it.  

Idea for a full top :
If i were making a full top of this, then I'd start with my motifs and join them to make the base of my top (so depending on the length you want - either hip or waist measurements used).  I'd make one side of my top all the way the straight lined armhole and then the square neckline following the instructions here for the armhole & neckline.  On reaching the two shoulders, I'd fasten off and make the second half of my top (or the back) - the only difference being the depth of the neckline, as the armhole, yet again, will be a straight one.
I'd then join the two shoulder blades, using the "join-as-you-go" method to complete the top.
I'd then join the sides and have a brand new motif top ready to be shown off.

Creativity is the only way to go J

Excited ? Let’s start.





Start : with a magic circle and work 8 sc in that circle.  
Join with a sl-st to the 1st sc.

Round 1 : dc in the 1st sc ; *ch 3, dc in the next sc* ;
rep *to* all around ; ch 3 and join with a sl-st to the 1st dc.  

Round 2 : dc in the 1st dc ; *3 dc in the next ch-3 sp ; dc in the next dc* ;
rep *to* all around ; ch 3 and join with a sl-st to the 1st dc. 

Round 3 : dc in the 1st dc ; *ch 3 , sk next dc , dc in the next dc* ;
rep *to* all around ; ch 3 and join with a sl-st to the 1st dc. 

Round 4 : dc in the 1st dc ;
{[3 dc in the next ch-3 sp] ; dc in the next dc ; rep [to] once ; dc in the next dc} ;
ch 4, dc in the next dc ;
*ch 2, dc in the same dc ; ch 4, dc in the next dc ; rep {to} once* ;
rep *to* all around ; ch 4 and join with a sl-st to the 1st dc. 

In the following round, we’ll work a decorative picot. 
Let’s use a 3-ch picot which is (ch 3, sl-st in the 3rd ch from hk)

Round 5 : dc in the 1st dc ;
{skipping next dc, [ch 1 + picot + ch 1 + dc in the next dc]} ; rep {to} once ;
(ch 1 + picot + ch 1, dc in the same last dc) ; rep {to} 2 times ;
*ch 2 + picot + ch 2, sk next dc, dc 3-tog in the next ch-2 sp ;
ch 5, dc 3-tog in the same ch-2 sp ; ch 2 + picot + ch 2, dc in the next dc ;
rep {to} 2 times ; rep (to) once*
ch 4 and join with a sl-st to the 1st dc. 

Fasten off and weave in ends.





This is one motif complete.

We will work each motif in this way, but we will join our motifs on that final round.  So for all further motifs, we only need to change instructions for that final round, which I will call Round 5A and am re-writing below.

We will be using the picots to join two squares.  The instructions below are just an indicator of how we will join.  However, there will be certain squares that need more joints that the instructions given below, but I am sure you have figured that out.

So before you join two motifs, ensure that the sections match.  Instructions are given in purple and brown for joining one side of your motif to the earlier motif.
The rest of the instructions stay the same as for Round 5 (i.e for all sides that are not being joined).
I know you’re wondering why this instruction is so convoluted – well, its mainly because of the picots .. but once you get one side joined, its easy peasy.

Round 5A : dc in the 1st dc ;
{skipping next dc, ch 1 + picot + ch 1 + dc in the next dc} ;
rep {to} once ; (ch 1 + picot + ch 1, dc in the same last dc) ; rep {to} 2 times ;
ch 2 + picot + ch 2, sk next dc, dc 3-tog in the next ch-2 sp ;
[ch 2 + join with a sl-st in the ch-5 sp of earlier motif + ch 2] , dc 3-tog in the same ch-2 sp ;
ch 2 + picot + ch 2, dc in the next dc ;
< skipping next dc, ch 2 + join with picot of earlier motif + ch 2 + dc in the next dc > ;
rep <to> once ; (ch 2 + join with picot of earlier motif + ch 2 + dc in the same last dc) ;
rep <to> 2 times ;
ch 2 + picot + ch 2, sk next dc, dc 3-tog in the next ch-2 sp ;
[ch 2 + join with a sl-st in the ch-5 sp of earlier motif + ch 2] , dc 3-tog in the same ch-2 sp ;  
*ch 2 + picot + ch 2, sk next dc, dc 3-tog in the next ch-2 sp ; ch 5, dc 3-tog in the same ch-2 sp ; ch 2 + picot + ch 2, dc in the next dc ; rep {to} 2 times ; rep (to) once*
ch 4 and join with a sl-st to the 1st dc. 


There, you’ve successfully joined two motifs. Now with each joint, you need to use instructions in purple / brown to join two motifs, and we’re done.

Once you’ve joined all your motifs, you’ve completed the yoke for this superb top.
Fasten off and weave in ends.
And can you believe how beautiful this yoke is !

Now the final question is “How many do I make?”.  This totally depends on the size of the garment you are creating.
You need to measure your motif and calculate how many you’d need to make the width of the top or yoke you’re making.  You will also similarly need to calculate how many you’d need to reach from say the bust level to say the shoulder level.


I have managed to work three motifs and almost cover the chest of my tee-shirt from side to side, and then one motif each makes up for the shoulder ‘straps’.  For the front, just for a difference, I’ve added one fourth motif in between.

Now if you decide to make this into a top, just keep working and adding motifs till you get the width of your project first, and then start adding them on top to get the length.

As these are squarish motifs, we will get (a) a square neckline and (b) a straight armhole.

Be adventurous, and add motifs around the armhole to get a ‘sleeve’.. and see how this yoke pattern can so easily be adapted to create a beautiful top.

Oh, I would suggest you join Round 5 to the top of your t-shirt ensuring that your motifs are free to add their decorative touch.  I have sewed this in by hand, but do feel free to machine it in.
Do share your ideas on how you’ve joined this to your shirt or top so that other viewers can also get ideas and create new products.

I know you will agree with me that this is one awesome project.. one small motif and so many possibilities.




Finishing :
Our finishing here is just weaving in and tidying up of all those loose ends. Ensure you glue it all down, as the worst thing is to have a little bit of thread peeping through where its not supposed to be and ruining all your hard work!

As I've attached my motifs onto a tee shirt, all I did was make the motifs to work across the chest, attach it on, and then cut away a part of the tee shirt material from inside.

And that’s done.. yet another project brilliantly executed ! J

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Have a great day and see you soon. J

I have a few yokes already made, and just in case you want a dekho at those free patterns … here you go  J

















I have a few tops already made, and just in case you want a dekho at those free patterns … here you go  J