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Saturday, 25 June 2016

J's SUPERB MOTIF WRAP




 
J's SUPERB MOTIF WRAP

This is a really beautiful pattern that I’ve decided to make into a wrap for my sister in law’s mum.  So come along and join me on this creation too.J

This write up has lots and lots of notes and I’d suggest that you do a quick read through first just so you have a mental picture of what we’re creating. It’ll all go much easier thereafter.

So I started with the motif wrap, and then made some changes.. which is why lots n lots of notes!

There are lots of photographs.. My sweet (lawful) sister willingly obliged.. and though her mum did oblige, she’s quite camera shy.. so enjoy the photos J

For this creation I’ve used this pattern that was shared just today. 
Thanks to Crochet by Heidi for sharing this and for this awesome un-named/unknown person who has made this project plus (lovingly n) freely shared this photo tutorial.

There are many who like a photo tutorial, but some of us like the written explanation too. So here are my notes for this pattern. https://www.facebook.com/CrochetByHeidi/photos/a.421686398025484.1073741834.134622930065167/428295304031260/?type=3&theater
If you’re going with the photo tutorial, click on the link and follow the tutorial.


Materials used : I’ve used about 2 skeins of this super soft Baby Marble double knit yarn plus about 100 gms of our Indian Vardhaman Milennium,  with a 4.5 mm crochet hook
For Indians : This yarn is a lot like our Indian Vardhaman Millenium yarn.


  
Abbreviations used :
fsc : Foundation single crochet                                   dc : Double crochet
ch : chain                                                                      ch-sp(s) : chain space(s)
sp(s) : space(s)                                                           rep : Repeat
yo : Yarn over                                                            sk : Skip
lp : Loop                                                                        hk : Hook


Stitches used :  (Using U.S terminology)

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3, I’d like to introduce this lovely new way of starting a dc row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video http://www.mooglyblog.com/chainless-starting-double-crochet/
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using the chainless dc start.

How to do a picot stitch : A neat video link to refresh this procedure.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GGlzZZl3I8


Instructions : (Using U.S terminology)
For this wrap, we will work two sets of motifs. One little rectangular motif, which will be in a long chain or strung up together, and these sets of small rectangular motifs will form one long motif.
This long motif will form one width of your wrap or scarf.
We will then attach these long motifs to form our wrap.
Yes, I know it sounds awesome .. and a little worrying.. but trust me, it isn’t.

Right, so we will first work two rows of dc that will form a little ‘motif’ (for want of a better word to describe it).  We will string on a row of motifs that will be the width of our scarf.  

Once you have made your first row of motifs, we will turn and come back to join them with a shelled section to the second row of motifs.

Remember that as you’re calculating the width of the project, our little rectangular motifs will go slanted when they are attached to the following rows, so do calculate for that little loss.
How do you calculate that loss ?

Simple..you work a few rectangles, across, (say 5” across), then work the joining rows and see how much you lose. So say you’ve started with 5” initially, see how wide that becomes on joining with the shells, and then accordingly calculate how many rectangular motifs you’d need for your width.  

Easy enough, right..so let’s start.



This is  my awesome border


and here is the photo tutorial for your convenience










Start Row 1 : with ch 12.   

 As I’m using a thickish sport / DK yarn, I have decided to use sc throughout.
However, if you are using a thinner ply yarn, use hdc or dc.  I will write the pattern using all dc, as that will probably be the most used stitch.J

Row 2 : dc in the 3rd ch from hook and in each ch till end. Turn. (10 dc)

Row 3 : dc in the 1st dc and each dc till end.  Ch 12. Turn.

The first two rows make up the first ‘motif’ like part of our scarf.  To work the second similar motif, we will work a chain (i.e the ch 12) off the end of this first motif.
The 1st 3 ch of this next section will be our 1st dc.

Row 3 : dc in the 3rd ch from hook and in each ch till end. Turn. (10 dc)

Row 4 : dc in the 1st dc and in each dc till end.  Ch 12.  Turn.

To work the next similar motif, we will work a chain (i.e the ch 12) off the end of this first motif.
The 1st 3 ch of this next section again,  will be our 1st dc.

Rep Rows 3 & 4 till you have sufficient motifs for the width of your project. 
Remember what I’d said before about the width of these motifs and how they measure in your project.

Right then, we’re now assuming you’ve got the width you need for this first block of motifs, and we’re going to continue our row numbering without a break. So on to Row 5.

In our following row, we’ll use our decorative picot stitch. Please go to the top of this blog and check for a  “how to” under stitches used.

We will use a ch-3 picot which is (ch 3, sl-st in the 3rd ch from hk).

Now we’re at the far end of our wrap, and at the right hand side corner stitch of our last ‘motif’.

Few quick things to pay attention to now on.
Our little rectangular motifs have a back and a front, but they are all ‘pivoted’ on that one ch and will be merrily swinging around. So ensure that you have them the right side up when working.

Row 5 : dc in the 1st corner dc ;
*[picot + dc in the same corner st] ; rep [to] once more ; 
picot + ch 8, sk next 8 dc, sl-st in the last dc (of this motif) ;
dc in the next dc (of the next motif)* ;
rep *to* till the last dc on the last motif.

We will now work around this long stretch of first motifs we’ve created to give the same shelled effect around the bottom of too.  So we will first work a [dc + picot] around the side, and then work around the bottom. OK.. so let’s get to it.

As this is just a continuation of the row, we’ll call it Row 5 A

As we work along the side, notice that we have 2 rows of dc.  I’d suggest that you work in the st or sp just between these two dc, which will be about the center of this side.

Row 5A : Turn your work 90° and work along the side of the end motif :
ch 1, dc in the centre of the dc ; [picot + dc in the same corner st] ;
rep [to] once more ; sl-st in the bottom corner dc;

We’re now at the bottom corner where we started, and will now work along the bottom of the row.  So yet again, for convenience, lets call this Row 5 B

Now this row is pretty easy. Firstly we’re working the same shelled picot design and we’re also going to work it in exactly the same sp, so let’s get this done now.

Row 5B : Turn your work 90° and work along the bottom of motifs :
*ch 8, sk next 8 dc, sl-st in the next dc (last dc of this motif set) ;
ch 1, dc in the centre of the next dc-set ;  [picot + dc in the same dc-set] ;
rep [to] once more* ;
rep *to* till the last dc on the last motif ;
rep 5A once and join with a sl-st to the 1st st.

We’ve just completed one long / large motif – the first of many long motifs for our wrap.
So this motif is the width of your wrap.
That said, you could make this a lot lot longer, and make this your length too.. and then your wrap will look completely different, though the pattern is exactly the same J

Our next long motif is made in exactly the same way for the first part, and then we will join it along the bottom to the 1st long motif. So if you take a look at the photo tutorial, you’ll see that we join our two long motifs with the center picots.  Doesn’t it look cute?

For our next motif rep Rows 1 – Row 5A.
There is just the small difference of joining in Row 5B, so let’s call our new joining row - Row 5C

Row 5C : Turn your work 90° and work along the bottom of motifs :
*ch 8, sk next 8 dc, sl-st in the next dc (last dc of this motif set) ;
ch 1, dc in the centre of the next dc-set ;
{ch 1, join with the corresponding centre picot of the 1st motif of the earlier long motif ;
ch 1, dc in the same dc-set }; [picot + dc in the same dc-set] ; * ;
rep *to* till the last dc on the last motif ;
rep 5A once and join with a sl-st to the 1st st.

Repeat Rows 2 – 5C till you have a wrap / scarf of the size you desire.

So this is the motif and if you keep working on these long rectangular motifs and joining them up, then that’s one wrap done.  However, I thought that the motifs were a little too open and I was not going to get a wrap warm enough for the person intended – so I decided to use the motifs just as a border and have used a simple shell design for the body of my wrap.



Body of wrap shell pattern
For the shell pattern, here are the instructions.  I am going to start numbering from 1 for the body of the wrap again. Please do not confuse it with the earlier instructions for the motif pattern.

We will work off that first row of dc from the motif row.

Row 1 : dc in the 1st dc ; sk next 3 dc, 4 dc in the next dc ;
*sk next 3 dc, 4 dc in the next dc* ;
rep *to* till the last 4 dc ; sk next 3 dc, dc in the last dc.  Turn.

From this row on, we will work in between dc’s, just for a difference of pattern


Row 2 : sk the 1st dc, 4 dc in the next the space between the 1st two dc ;
*sk next 4 dc, 4 dc in the space between this and the next dcs* ;
rep *to* till the last space.  Turn.

Row 3 : dc in the 1st dc ; 4 dc in the next the space between the 1st two dc ;
*sk next 4 dc, 4 dc in the space between this and the next dcs* ;
rep *to* till the last dc ; dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Rep Rows 2 & 3 till you have the length of the wrap needed.




So what I’ve done is worked a few motif rows, and then worked the body shell pattern, and then attached the motif rows back again at the other end to get my unusual and totally cool wrap.








I loved making it.. my sister in law was happily thrilled that it was not too holey/lacy and was warm for her mum and her mum… aah, she had the most beautiful experience of all as not only was she not expecting this, but these are totally her colours, the yarn was so soft and it was warm to boot. So as you can imagine, I am .. well, on top of Cloud 9.
Hope you have as much fun creating and gifting your creation too.

Here are some of my earlier neckwear projects



And for a “how-to wear this creation” demo, visit

























































































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Have a great day and see you soon. J