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Friday, 4 December 2015

LATTICED SPIDER SHAWL

 
LATTICED SPIDER SHAWL

This shawl goes out to a lovely (nearly) 100 year-old lady I met recently when I visited my sister-in-law.  One usually thinks that the worst things happen *just* to us, and then one meets someone like this , who has had a pretty difficult life, nearly reaching a century, and is still smiling and enjoys waking up every morning.


I was fortunate to have made a shawl for two other hundred year old lovely ladies, and I have written out one of those patterns.  (Check out my Centenarian shawl on my blog)

I found this freebie that I found on Pinterest with a convenient chart, and these are my notes as I make my own latticed spider shawl.

Materials used : Indian 3-ply, light fingering yarn with a 3.5 mm crochet hook

This will be superb with our Indian Anchor cotton and a 3.5 – 4 mm crochet hook too.

Difficulty level : Intermediate to Advanced skill level

Stitches used :  (Using U.S terminology)

Magic circle : To refresh your skill, please view this easy video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLuSVyKvoUg

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3,I’d like to introduce a lovely way of starting a double crochet row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using this chainless dc start.

We start with a magic circle that will be the centre back spine, and will be that part that fits right under the neck.  We will then work our way down the shawl, ending with this absolutely stunning border.  Itching to get started, so let’s do it.

Start with a magic circle and 3 dc in that circle.  Pull lightly to close.  Turn.

Row 1 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk next dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 2 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 3 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc ; dc in the next ch-3 sp ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 4 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 5, sk next 2 dc ,
(sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp) ; 
ch 5, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 5 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 7, sk next 2 dc ; 
(sc in the next ch-5 sp ; sc in next 3 sc ; sc in the next ch-5 sp) ; 
ch 7, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 6 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk next dc ; dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-7 sp ; (ch 5, sk 1st sc, sc in next 3 sc) ; 
ch 5, sk next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-7 sp ; dc in the next dc ; 
ch 3, sk next dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

And just as we’re finishing our first spider stitch, we’re starting off on the next one.

Row 7 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; 
(ch 3, sk next 2 dc ; dc in the next ch-3 sp) ; 
ch 3, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ; 
ch 5, sk next sc, dc in the next sc ; ch 5, sk next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp, dc in the next dc ; rep (to) once ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc and 3 dc in the last dc. Turn.

The next row is a rep of Row 4, in a way.

Row 8 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; 
(ch 5, sk next 2 dc , sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp) ; 
ch 5, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 1, sk next dc , 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ; dc in the next dc ; 
rep (to) once ; ch 5, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn. 

The next row is a rep of Row 5, in a way.

Row 9 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; 
(ch 7, sk next 2 dc , sc in the next ch-5 sp ; sc in next
3 sc ; sc in the next ch-5 sp) ; 
ch 7, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; dc in the next ch-1 sp ; dc in the next dc ; 
rep (to) once ; ch 7, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

The next row is a rep of Row 6, in a way.
Row 10 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; 
(ch 3, sk next dc ; dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-7 sp ; ch 5, sk 1st sc, sc in next 3 sc ; ch 5, sk next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-7 sp ; dc in the next dc) ; 
rep (to) 2 times ; ch 3, sk next dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

The next row is a rep of Row 7, in a way.

Row 11 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; 
(ch 3, sk next 2 dc ; dc in the next ch-3 sp ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 5, sk next sc, dc in the next sc ; ch 5, sk next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp, dc in the next dc) ; 
rep (to) once ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc and 3 dc in the last dc. Turn.

Put your work down and see the three little diamonds of spider stitch we’ve created thus far. You would probably have figured out repeats as well.

The next row is a rep of Row 8, in a way.

Row 12 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; 
(ch 5, sk next 2 dc , sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp ; ch 5, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 1, sk next dc , 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ; dc in the next dc) ; 
rep (to) 2 times ; ch 5, sk next 2 dc, sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp ; ch 5, sk next 2 dc , 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn. 

The next row is a rep of Row 9, in a way.

Row 13 : ch 3, 3 dc in the 1st dc ; 
(ch 7, sk next 2 dc , sc in the next ch-5 sp ; sc in next 3 sc ; sc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 7, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; dc in the next ch-1 sp ; dc in the next dc) ; 
rep (to) once ; ch 7, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

So now if you’re planning on doing this whole scarf/shawl as just latticed spider diamonds, then your repeat will be Rows 10 – 13, ending in a Row 13.  I would then either leave it as it is, or do one row of dc all the way along that edge to give it a nice tight and even finish.

If however, we’re doing the pattern with the ‘holey, lacy’ centre, do carry on with me.
So we will do one more repeat for this pattern from Rows 10 – 13 once, increasing one diamond spider stitch, and having four diamonds for the base of our project.  We will end at Row 13, and then we will *split* our work at that centre (dc ; ch 1, dc) bit.  I’d like you to identify and mark the dc that’s in that centre ch-1 sp, which is bang in the centre of this shawl.  We will then have two diamonds on each side, and then work on the lacy bit in the centre.
The diamond pattern along the sides then continues in the same way as we’ve done this far, and the centre bit is just a dc ; ch 1, sk next st, dc in the next dc.  Simple enough, right.

Next row : Work Row 10 for 2 diamonds till you reach the marked centre dc ; ch 1, sk that centre dc ; work Row 10 again for the final 2 diamonds on that row.

Next row : Work Row 11 for 2 diamonds till you reach the marked centre dc ; 
(ch 1, sk next dc) ; [ch 1, dc in the next dc] ; rep [to] 2 times ; 
rep (to) once ; work Row 11 again for the final 2 diamonds on that row.

In the next round we will repeat Row 12 and the centre lacy bit will increase in the (to) and [to].

Continue this till you get the shawl till the length you want. 







Finishing :

A lovely shawl always needs a lovely finish.

So options : You could do a row of sc on that top edge.

Or, though both the chart and finished shawl do not show it, you could work a lovely picot edging and here’s a quick refresher on how to do that.

One could also add beads for a little bling to this already beautiful creation. 

And here’s a quick link on how to add beads in your project https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MbLCuyfv-M

And just in case you are trying to work out how to thread your beads onto your yarn, then here’s a lovely video link

Fasten off and weave in ends.

Block as per yarn requirements.. and then do show your lovely work off.  Please do tag me on Facebook when you finish your product, as I’d love to see your creation(s).

Enjoyed this ?? I sure did.. come back right here for more freebie patterns J

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Have a great day and see you soon. J

I have a more neckwear that you may like to take a look at