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Thursday, 9 June 2016

MARY’S PONCHO / WRAP


MARY’S PONCHO / WRAP

I was gifted this really lovely baby soft acrylic yarn and I decided to make something for my beautiful for my friend.  I was looking for something just right.. and Providence stepped in .. this was shared on Facebook. 

The original pattern is a knitting pattern – so I thought I'd write a pattern out for it with that knitting chart.  As soon as I made it, I thankfully showed it to a friend, who said she knew there was a crochet version too.. and there is one. J
I'd written my notes down anyway, so I thought I'd share them.. but PLEASE check the ORIGINAL PATTERN links below.


As you can see this particular project fits almost any body type and looks superb.

I love that Mary has found several unique ways to use this wrap and has enjoyed each new experiment - sadly though, her pictures do not do her justice.


Materials used : Today I’ve used about 400 gms of this really lovely Lion Baby soft acrylic yarn,  with a 4.5 mm crochet hook.
For Indians : This yarn is a lot like our 3 – 4 ply acrylic yarn in thickness.

Size made : From one wingtip to another ~ 67” and a width of ~ 21” at the broadest part.

Skill level : Intermediate to advanced.
The stitches used are simple, but there are combinations and requirements that are a little difficult.

Abbreviations used :  Using U.S terminology
fdc : Foundation double crochet                                dc : Double crochet
ch : chain                                                                       ch-sp : chain space
sp : space                                                                       rep : Repeat
lp : Loop                                                                         hk : Hook
st(s) : Stitch(es)                                                           yo : Yarn Over
blo : Back Loop only
fpdc : Front Post Double Crochet

Stitches usedUsing U.S terminology
fsc : Foundation Single Crochet : To refresh your skill on the fsc, please view this superb video by Tamara Kelly at the link  http://www.mooglyblog.com/foundation-single-crochet-fsc/

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3, I’d like to introduce this lovely new way of starting a dc row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video http://www.mooglyblog.com/chainless-starting-double-crochet/
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using the chainless dc start.

fpdc : Front Post Double Crochet :Post stitches are stitches worked around the post of a stitch of the row below.
yo, hk into sp between posts of st from row below – going from back of stitch, around st and into the front of the st ; yo, pull yarn through the sps (3 lps on hk), (yo & pull through 2 lps) twice.  One fpdc complete

 InstructionsUsing U.S terminology

Quick analysis of what we’re going to do here today.  We start with a row of fsc which will be the width of our poncho.  We will then work in a rectangle (of sorts) with one side straight and the other side undulating with arrow-like points.

Below is the knitting chart for the pattern.  I've used the same idea and adapted it to work in the crochet pattern.




Our pattern therefore has two parts – one part that is made up of all dc (or fpdc) and the second part that has the ch-1 sps.

To make our arrow-like points, we will be decreasing one dc and ch-1 sp each row, and at the same time, we will ensure that we have 12 ch-1 sps at the arrow-like end at each row. 
Now as we’re decreasing the dc & ch-1 sp and ensuring we keep the number of ch-1 sps constant, we will be adding one ch-1 sp at each row, thus reducing the number of dc / fpdc stitches each row.

This will then give you the lovely arrow like pattern and the fpdc will give you a fantastic effect all at the same time.

Start : with fsc that is the width of the poncho you’re making.  Turn.

We will be working just about half of this row in dc and the other bit will be with ch-1 sps.  So if you want, place a marker in the 25thfsc from end.

Row 1 : dc in the 1stfsc and in each fsc till the last 24 fsc (or the marked fsc) ;
[ch 1, sk next fsc, hdc in the next fsc] ;
rep [to] 11 times till end. Turn

Row 2 : sl-st in the 1sthdc and 1st ch-1 sp ; hdc in the next hdc ;
[ch 1, hdc in the next hdc] ;
rep [to] 10 times ;
(ch 1, sk next dc, hdc in the next dc) ;
fpdc in each dc till the last dc ; dc in the last dc. Turn

Once again, we will be working just about half of this row in fpdc and the other bit will be with ch-1 sps.  So if you want, place a marker yet again in the 25thst from end. Just remember that the 25th st will include dc as well as ch-1 sps.

Row 3 : dc in the 1stdc ; fpdc in each dc till the last 24 sts (or the marked st) ;
[ch 1, sk next dc, hdc in the next dc] ; 
{ch 1, hdc in the next hdc} ;
rep {to} 11 times till end. Turn

Stop and let’s see what we’re creating here.See our two sides – the pattern coming along on the fpdc side, and there are still 12 ch-1 sps on the other side, and as we’re moving the ch-1 sps, we’re getting a nice arrow-like pattern.

Row 4 : sl-st in the 1sthdc and 1st ch-1 sp ; hdc in the next hdc ;
[ch 1, hdc in the next hdc] ;
rep [to] 10 times ;
(ch 1, sk next dc, hdc in the next dc) ; fpdc in each dc till the last dc ;
dc in the last dc. Turn

Rows 5 – 8 : Rep Rows 3 & 4

On the following row, we will add 15 ch at the end of the row, and we will extend row by these stitches – i.e we will have a row of the same length as the first fsc row.
See what we’re doing?  So once we have the same length, we will work all these again to get the arrow-like ends once again. Neat, huh?

Row 9 : dc in the 1stdc ; fpdc in each dc till the ch-1 sp ; 
(dc in the next ch-1 sp ; fpdc in the next hdc) ;
rep (to) 7 times ;
[ch 1, hdc in the next hdc] ; rep [to] 3 times ; ch 15. Turn

In the following row, we will work an hdc in the 2nd ch.  We will use that 1st ch as a turning chain.
In case you are not happy with this start, then please add 2 more ch, and then work your 1st hdc in the 3rd ch from hk.

Row 10 : hdc in the2nd ch from hk ;
[ch 1, sk next ch, hdc in the next ch] ;
rep [to] 6 times ;
(ch 1, hdc in the next hdc) ; rep (to) 3 times ;
{ch 1, sk next dc, hdc in the next dc} ; fpdc in each dc till the last dc ; dc in the last dc. Turn

Let’s stop once again and check out what we’ve done.
So you have one little wing tip and then this finger-like projection you’ve just made.
Now you will work on this finger-like projection, reducing stitches on that finger-like ch-1 sp end, and still keeping the other fpdc end constant. 
That way you will be building your second wing tip on this finger-like projection. Got it?

Once again, we will be working just about half of this row in fpdc and the other bit will be with ch-1 sps.  So if you want, place a marker yet again in the 25thst from end. Just remember that the 25th st will include dc as well as ch-1 sps.

Row 11 : dc in the 1stdc ; fpdc in each dc till the last 24 sts (or the marked st) ;
[ch 1, sk next dc, hdc in the next dc] ; 
{ch 1, hdc in the next hdc} ; rep {to} 11 times till end. Turn

Stop and let’s see what we’re creating here.See our two sides – the pattern coming along on the fpdc side, and there are still 12 ch-1 sps on the other side, and as we’re moving the ch-1 sps, we’re getting a nice arrow-like pattern.

Row 12 : sl-st in the 1sthdc and 1st ch-1 sp ; hdc in the next hdc ;
[ch 1, hdc in the next hdc] ; rep [to] 10 times ;
(ch 1, sk next dc, hdc in the next dc) ; fpdc in each dc till the last dc ; dc in the last dc. Turn

Rows 13 – 16 : Rep Rows 11 & 12

On the following row, we will add 15 ch at the end of the row, and we will extend row by these stitches – i.e we will have a row of the same length as the first fsc row.

See what we’re doing?  So once we have the same length, we will work all these again to get the arrow-like ends once again. Neat, huh?

Row 17 : dc in the 1stdc ; fpdc in each dc till the ch-1 sp ; 
(dc in the next ch-1 sp ; fpdc in the next hdc) ; rep (to) 7 times ;
[ch 1, hdc in the next hdc] ; rep [to] 3 times ; ch 15. Turn

In the following row, we will work an hdc, once again, in the 2nd ch.  We will use that 1st ch as a turning chain.
In case you are not happy with this start, then please add 2 more ch, and then work your 1st hdc in the 3rd ch from hk.

You have surely figured the pattern by now.
Your repeat rows are Rows 10 – 17 with all the explanations in between.

Continue these repeats till you have a project that wraps around both your shoulders and just meets in the front centre. 
We will then return to join these two sections and create your poncho.

Now here’s a neat tweak.  I quite like this wrap as it is, and you could well keep increasing the length till its just a wrap that you will not join around the front, but can wrap around your shoulders about 1.25 times. 
The stitches that we have used here have a really wonderful stretch.  Please ensure that you check how much you need to wrap around as it is pretty easy to go just slightly over.  I am saying this as this is what happened with mine.  I still love what I’ve created, and I find that there are still innumerable possibilities, but I *think* I could’ve made it a little bit less long.

So go ahead, create and have fun.

Feast your eyes on the many ways you can drape this creation - and all the lovely models who willingly draped this on for me.









Finishing :
Once again, I have used the original knitting pattern  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/lace-cotton-ponchette to join the two ends of the poncho. 

Attach the shoulders and the sides of the top together. 
At the start, I told you about the length of this wrap and how our stitches make it stretchy and allow it to wrap well around the shoulders.  Ensure that you check and like the fit around the shoulders before you finish it.

If you think you need to, then work a round of sc all around the neckline,  round arm and the bottom of the top. 

As we’ve started with a fdc chain, that start row (or bottom of top) is neatly finished, but that’s up to you.

Fasten off and weave in ends.  Give yourself a big pat on the back as this one has really been yet another great project .. and so different from the others we’ve worked on together.. and once again, totally worth it, I’m sure you’ll agree.

And that’s done.. yet another project brilliantly executed ! J

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Have a great day and see you soon. J
  
I have a few scarves & shawls already made, and just in case you want a dekho at those free patterns … here you go  J